Monday, December 26, 2011

Giveaway Reminder: Beth's Book Reviews Bookmarks

This is your weekly reminder to enter if you haven't yet.

I wanted to share a little something with my readers so I ordered some bookmarks.  They came out super cute, if I do say so myself.

I'll be giving away one a week to a random reader who enters his or her name in the nifty little form below.

This is an ongoing giveaway so you can enter at any time and you only need to enter once!

The contest is only open to readers with a US mailing address (but it can be a PO Box!)









Featured Book: Tires Optional by Rick Reale



Tires OptionalIn 1963, unable to sell his ‘55 Buick for the then exorbitant price of $25.00, Rick and two young friends set off in the road tank for a 6,000 mile cross country and back road trip. Their combined wealth was $325.00.

The first 3000 miles was driven in 58 hours, despite being slowed down by collecting a few speeding tickets, going to a police station at 3 a.m. to pay a $34.00 fine, getting lost in St. Louis for two hours, stopping for an oil change, and attending mass on Sunday morning.

Life was good.

Four porthole Buick Roadmasters. ‘57 T-Birds. GTO’s, Barracudas and Buick Wildcat convertibles. These were the trusty inhabitants of Rick’s automotive world. Even a ’41 Packard Clipper sedan with a hood as long as most people’s driveways.

The list of splendid -- and some not so splendid -- cars that Rick has owned goes on and on, and Rick has a story for each of them.

Tires Optional brings back the days when a good car cost you less than a hundred bucks, drain oil was ten cents a quart, and a gallon of gas was a mere two bits. If the car had a radio, you were listening to Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis. America was strong and was respected, and we made cars that didn’t sound like a Campbell’s soup can when you tapped the hood.








About the author:

Rick Reale is a former educator who turned tradesman and fulfilled the spirit of art and craftsmanship through colors and decoration. His hobby of automotive interests provided him endless opportunities to study the history of mechanical transportation and experience firsthand many of these wheeled wonders. Ironically, he has spent the last fifty years with a great lady who hates car talk, but who quietly has put up with him and his antics while working full time and raising four accomplished offspring.




Monday, December 19, 2011

Giveaway Reminder: Beth's Book Reviews Bookmarks

This is your weekly reminder to enter if you haven't yet.

I wanted to share a little something with my readers so I ordered some bookmarks.  They came out super cute, if I do say so myself.

I'll be giving away one a week to a random reader who enters his or her name in the nifty little form below.

This is an ongoing giveaway so you can enter at any time and you only need to enter once!

The contest is only open to readers with a US mailing address (but it can be a PO Box!)









Sunday, December 18, 2011

Featured Book: When I Was a Child by T.L. Needham



When I Was a Child: Based on a true story of love, death, and survival on the Kansas prairieOn Ash Wednesday, 1926, a young couple, Alex and Theresa, left their six children home on the farm. They drove through heavy rains to attend Mass in town. That’s when the temperature dropped fast, and the heavy rain became a snowy windswept blizzard. Only one of them would survive that night. The terrible loss upended the lives of this working-class family in ways no one could have expected. Through it all, the ironclad bonds of love held them together as they endured the Great Depression and an unceasing string of trials, losses, and hardships. Based on actual events, When I Was a Child documents the inner strength, courage, and sheer grit that steadied the couple’s children through loss, economic crises, tornados, dust storms and war. Focusing on the extraordinary life of Louis Pfeifer, this vividly rendered book juxtaposes vignettes of a tragic past—the loss of a mother, father, and grandmother—against Louis’s harrowing experiences as an 82nd Airborne paratrooper and prisoner of war during World War II. What emerges is an inspirational story of love and family bonds as Louis and his siblings grow up to become devoted, successful parents—despite all odds. Powerful, honest, and unflinching, When I Was a Child is about the suffering that life inflicts—and the bravery that gets us to the other side, becoming much wiser and stronger along the way.








About the author:

T. L. Needham, a native of Kansas City, grew up with the tales of survival of his mother’s family, who endured life during the 1920s and 1930s in western Kansas. His publishing background is extensive. Needham published Pesky Poems, a collection, in 2008. He is the author of Winning and Keeping Relocation Business. Needham also founded and wrote for Relocation/Realty UPDATE news magazine during the 1980s and 90s, and was publisher of Kansas City Parent magazine. Needham was a national speaker and trainer on corporate relocation and real estate issues two decades. He lives in Illinois.




Monday, December 12, 2011

Giveaway Reminder: Beth's Book Reviews Bookmarks

This is your weekly reminder to enter if you haven't yet.

I wanted to share a little something with my readers so I ordered some bookmarks.  They came out super cute, if I do say so myself.

I'll be giving away one a week to a random reader who enters his or her name in the nifty little form below.

This is an ongoing giveaway so you can enter at any time and you only need to enter once!

The contest is only open to readers with a US mailing address (but it can be a PO Box!)









Sunday, December 11, 2011

Featured Book: A Doctor's Journey by Frederic A. Mendelsohn M.D.



A Doctor's Journey: A Collection of MemoirsPracticing neurologist Frederic A. Mendelsohn takes you on an insider’s journey through the sometimes startling landscape of American medicine today. Inspired by his own encounters during thirty-five years of clinical practice, Mendelsohn’s stories range from the tragic to the droll, but each speaks in some way to the incredible strength of the human spirit. Here’s a taste of the remarkable stories in A Doctor’s Journey: “Searching for Salvation” – A teenage boy is seriously injured in a boating accident, but the effects of his accident are even greater on the boy who injured him. “Casanova Complex” – A gifted surgeon who looks like Tom Cruise – “if Tom Cruise were on steroids” – gets an unexpected fifteen minutes of fame while romping with a hospital nurse. “Wally the Whale” – A tale about several epileptic patients, but mostly about Wally, an unforgettable character who tries to murder the good doctor. “Angela's Angel” – A young woman, critically injured in a motor vehicle accident, makes a miraculous recovery, but the infant daughter of her angelic sister – who has been part of that recovery -- suffers a heartbreaking medical tragedy of her own. “Mambo Mendez” – Part confessional, part memoir, part introduction to the author’s musical heritage, this story shows the struggle of blending family life with the rigors of a medical practice. Mendelsohn also explores the notion that a strong background in Debussy, Ravel and Satie may do as much to prompt the mental creativity and flexibility essential to successful doctoring as does a comprehensive training in phrenic nerves and conversion disorders.



About the author:


Frederic A. Mendelsohn attended undergraduate school on a music scholarship before he entered medical school. He now practices neurology in Suffolk County, New York, and is an adjunct clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology at Stonybrook University Medical School. He is also a professional artist. Dr. Mendelsohn is married and has three sons and three grandchildren.




Monday, December 5, 2011

Giveaway Reminder: Beth's Book Reviews Bookmarks

This is your weekly reminder to enter if you haven't yet.

I wanted to share a little something with my readers so I ordered some bookmarks.  They came out super cute, if I do say so myself.

I'll be giving away one a week to a random reader who enters his or her name in the nifty little form below.

This is an ongoing giveaway so you can enter at any time and you only need to enter once!

The contest is only open to readers with a US mailing address (but it can be a PO Box!)










Sunday, December 4, 2011

Featured Book: American Due Process by Dr. Paul A. Jones



American Due ProcessWe need due process to prevent the conviction of innocent people, but when due process is used as a gimmick by the guilty to obstruct justice, we have to take a stand. When due process is used to create endless delays and spurious appeals, we have to take a stand.

After seeing so many of those who were factually guilty manipulate the current criminal justice system to avoid or minimize their punishment, Dr. Paul Jones realized changes needed to be made in order for there to be true and equal justice for all.

Private defense attorneys, for instance, should be a thing of the past, except in civil cases. Otherwise, there are two standards of justice: one for the rich, who can afford high priced representation, one for the poor, who must use a public defender. By eliminating private defense attorneys and using only court appointed public defenders, justice would become equal for all.

In American Due Process, Dr. Jones recommends more than a dozen, well thought out changes, to the criminal justice system, including making changes to the Bill of Rights. It provides a system that will make sure those accused of crimes have their rights protected while those seeking to avoid punishment are less able to manipulate the system unfairly.








About the author:

Dr. Paul A. Jones holds a B.A. in Psychology, an M.A. in Education Psychology, an M.S. in Clincial Psychology and a Doctor of Divinity in Counseling.

He has worked in mental health institutions in North Carolina, Tennessee and Texas as a psychiatric aide and as an educational diagnostician and a counselor in the criminal justice system and in the public school systems.

He likes music, art, weight lifting and auto mechanics, has been married fifty-one years and enjoys spending time with his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

He is also the author of "The Myth of Rehabilitation".