Monday, September 24, 2012

Guest Post: Nick Redfern author of The World's Weirdest Places

Nick Redfern, author of the book The World's Weirdest Places, stopped by to share with us a piece he wrote.




What Makes a Place Weird, Truly Weird?
By Nick Refern


If someone gets a fleeting glance of an Unidentified Flying Object soaring across the skies of New York City, does that make the famous Big Apple weird? If a hairy, eight foot tall Bigfoot briefly and enigmatically appears in the thick forests outside of Seattle, does that make the city weird? And if a chain-rattling member of the living-dead club materializes for a second or two in the grounds of Buckingham Palace, London, England, does that make the residence of Queen Elizabeth II weird? The answer is no, it does not, to all three of the above scenario.


What we have in each of these instances is a singular, stand-alone, strange event that has occurred in one particular locale. But, by definition, the place itself is not weird. Only the thing that decided to put in a one-time, brief appearance was weird. That is not always the case, however. On far more than a few occasions, it is the place itself – and not just the mysterious phenomena that manifest in its midst – that is weird, and incredibly richly so, too.


Expanding on the above, if that same Bigfoot, UFO, and chain-rattling ghost all appear in one particular, concise location, time and again (and quite possibly even for centuries, too), and along with a fantastic range of other bizarre things too, such as nothing less than lake- monsters, poltergeists, strange energies and vortexes, werewolves, occult activity, aliens, and enigmatic entities including fairies, elves and goblins, then this is all highly suggestive that the place is truly weird in the extreme!


But the definition of that very emotive word – weird – is most certainly wide open to interpretation. For some, it may simply mean odd or eccentric. For others it might imply terror, fear, panic, and sheer, unrelenting horror. A significant number of people might be inclined to suggest the word equates to unspeakable foulness and revulsion of the highest order; the type of awful thing that lurks in the shadows of the woods on the proverbial dark and stormy night. Or, that it’s a most apt term to use when describing matters of a supernatural or occult nature, such as life after death, alien encounters, and fantastic monsters.


It’s not enough, however, to simply record the fact that our planet seems to have far more than its fair share of certain, specific areas that act as veritable magnets for mysterious events, strange creatures, UFOs and aliens, enigmatic entities like fairies and goblins, and an absolute multiplicity of spectral figures of a wide and dizzying nature. The bigger question that requires a solid answer is surely this: why, exactly, do these magnet-like beacons for all things supernatural even exist in the first place?


To answer that question, there is a need to dig deep into what are known in particle- physics-based research as wormholes. Imagine, if you will for a moment or several, a kind of cosmic version of New York’s Subway System, or London’s sprawling underground railway. Just like its terrestrial equivalents, the cosmic variety allows you to jump on at one point and get off at another of your personal choosing. But, this one also allows you to do something else, too; something near unique and astonishing. Namely, it provides you with the ability to completely bypass the cumbersome and time-consuming major problem of having to travel from Point A to Point B in linear, minute by minute fashion. This is where the wormhole concept comes into play in undeniably spectacular fashion.


In essence, a wormhole is nothing less than a theoretical shortcut that has the ability to cut a definitive swathe through the very fabric of both space and time, not unlike the scenario famously portrayed in the 1994 movie Stargate, starring Kurt Russell and James Spader. In the movie, the U.S. military secretly deciphers a series of codes and hieroglyphics adorned on a huge, ancient, stone ring found at Giza, Egypt back in 1928 – codes and hieroglyphics which turn out to be nothing less than coordinates for far away stars and galaxies. And, by entering those same coordinates into the Stargate of the film’s title, the Universe is, quite literally opened up to Uncle Sam.


There’s one particular type of wormhole called the Lorentzian Traversable Wormhole that may play a role in all this. So-called Lorentzian Traversable Wormholes might, physicists speculate, not only permit travel from one part of the universe to another, but also at an incredibly fast rate of speed, and possibly even near-instantaneously, too. Moreover, the two points of connection may very possibly be static, stable and unchanging.


In other words, we would have a situation where strange entities from strange worlds, realms and dimensions – entities possibly deeply adept and skilled at negotiating our very plane of existence via the advanced science of wormholes - might pop up time and time again at certain, specific locales on our planet. Those same locales could allow for nothing less than potential permanent connection with the domains of the mysterious others that have for so long been staple parts of our culture, history, mythologies, folklore, religions and belief-systems, and perceived variously as aliens, demons, monsters, gods, or as countless other paranormal conundrums. Definitive weird places, indeed!

 


About the book:

NICK REDFERN HAS THREE IMPORTANT and thought provoking questions for you, the discerning connoisseur of distinct high-strangeness. If someone is lucky enough to get a fleeting
glance of a UFO soaring across the skies of New York, does that make the Big Apple weird? If a large and lumbering Bigfoot briefly and enigmatically appears in the thick forests outside of Seattle, does that make the city weird? And if a chain-rattling member of the living-dead club materializes for a second or two in the grounds of Buckingham Palace, London, England, does that make the residence of Queen Elizabeth II weird? The answer is no, it does not, to all three of the above.

What we have in each of these instances is a singular, stand-alone, strange event that has occurred in one particular locale. But, by definition, the place itself is not weird. Only the thing that decided to put in a one-time, brief appearance was weird. That is not always the case, however. On far more than a few occasions, it is the place itself – and not just the mysterious phenomena that manifest in its midst – that is weird, and incredibly richly so, too.

Expanding on the above, if that same Bigfoot, UFO, and chain-rattling ghost all appear in one particular, concise location, time and again (possibly even for centuries), and along with a fantastic range of other bizarre things too, such as nothing less than lake-monsters, poltergeists, strange energies and vortexes, werewolves, occult activity, aliens, and enigmatic entities including fairies, elves and goblins, then this is all highly suggestive that the place is truly weird in the extreme! But the definition of that very emotive word – weird – is most certainly wide open to interpretation. For some, it may simply mean odd or eccentric. For others it might imply terror, fear, panic, and sheer, unrelenting horror. A significant number of people might be inclined to suggest the word equates to unspeakable foulness and revulsion of the highest order; the type of awful thing that lurks in the shadows of the woods on the proverbial dark and stormy night. Or, that it’s a most apt term to use when describing matters of a supernatural or occult nature, such as life after death, alien encounters, and fantastic monsters. And that’s what you get in The World’s Weirdest Places: a study of unrelenting weirdness, in all its many and varied forms, guises and definitions, throughout recorded history, and at numerous areas on a worldwide level, no less.

In the packed pages of Nick Redfern’s The World’s Weirdest Places, you will learn the startling truths of the many amazing, paranormal, and uncanny hot-spots that pepper our planet, as well as the terrible things that call such places their permanent homes. They are hot-spots that extend from the United States of America to Russia, from Scotland to Canada, from the Philippines to England, from Iceland to Australia, from Guyana to the Solomon Islands, and from just about anywhere and everywhere else in between, too.



About the author:
 
NICK REDFERN works full-time as an author, lecturer and journalist. He writes about a wide range of unsolved mysteries, including Bigfoot, UFOs, the Loch Ness Monster, alien encounters, and government conspiracies. He writes for UFO Magazine; Fate; and Fortean Times. His previous books include Keep Out!; The Real Men in Black; The NASA Conspiracies; Contactees and Memoirs of a Monster Hunter. An extremely popular media guest, Nick has appeared on numerous television shows, including:

  • VH1’s Legend Hunters
  • BBC’s Out of this World
  • History Channel’s Ancient Aliens, Monster Quest, America’s Book of Secrets and UFO
  • Hunters
  • National Geographic Channel’s The Truth about UFOs and Paranatural
  • Countdown with Keith Olbermann
  • SyFy Channel’s Proof Positive

Nick can be contacted at http://nickredfernsbooks.blogspot.com.




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